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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
that gave him more latitude with the conservative base of the party. >> woodruff: speak of boston, and other places, let's hear now from our colleagues-- actually, ray suarez is in chicago. he and margaret warner are at the two presidential campaign headquarters, but, ray, we're going to come to you first. are you in chicago, and that's where president obama is tonight. >> that's right. he's just a few miles away. he's not here yet. and neither are a lot of the senior officials from the campaign. i think they probably want to waito see a little bit more, but illinois senior senator, senator dick durbin is here, and there have been a lot of poll closings, a lot of projections, but so far no surprises. what do you need to see before you can really relax? >> some of the key battled ground states-- florida, virginia, ohio, and of course when we get in the midwest, a little closer to my activity in the last few months for the president, taking a look at wis cons and i know iowa. if we can get the job done in the midwest, and i hope we do glie you're not up thisickle. whn you don't have a race, wh
our colleague ray swawrers and hopefully we'll be joined by margaret warner in boston. ray is at the presidential candidate night headquarters in chicago. ray, what is the sense right now? when we talk about this ground game issue, what does the campaign say about what they have over the romney campaign in terms of ground game? >> they said this time instead of sending volunteers and sending field workers from state to state, they concentrated much more heavily on using people that people know. i mean it sounds kind of obvious. but all the research shows that when someone you know talks about you... talks to you about casting the vote in the first place or voting for the person you prefer, that has a lot more impact than somebody showing up at your door with paperwork, a leaflet or a pitch for a candidate. so they've put much more emphasis on having people work their own neighborhoods this time around. and they say they have hit their marks, that they are getting out their numbers. and so far so good. gwen? >> ifill: well, ray, i'm also curious. you're standing there at the
to say, as a guy from boston, seemed like a pretty good game to me. >> i'll say this, the first two games yesterday were terrific. that game just sent us to bed early. thank you for that. >> thanks. >>> now, to a deadly boat accident that happened just off the coast of florida. a woman is dead and several more were hurt after a boat capsized near pompano beach, florida. the group was back from a thanksgiving diving trip. and bazi kanani has the story. >> reporter: witnesses say the wave came out of nowhere. >> it was windy. there were waves rolling in. >> reporter: the force, apparently so intense, water went over the 45-foot catamaran, tossing the 21 divers and 2 crew members onboard into the ocean. >> chaos. people just in the water and stuff. it's like unbelievable. >> reporter: and rolling the massive boat upside down. >> the wave caught it from behind and it flipped, as he was coming in the harbor. >> reporter: investigators say one woman was killed after she was trapped beneath the capsized boat. other passengers, many with injuries, climbed out of the water and on to the overturned
, and boston. amtrak is telling passengers to make reservations by telephone or online to avoid sold-out trains and long lines at ticket counters. crews are still repairing damage caused by the storm last week. >>> a family trip turns into a tragedy after a toddler falls more than a dozen feet to his death at the zoo. >>> and the big walk in d.c. today to raise awareness for the number one cancer killer in the united states. >>> zoo officials in pittsburgh are promising a full investigation after a tragedy there this morning a. 3-year-old boy died after falling 13 feet into an exhibit of endangered wild dogs. the animals attacked him before keepers could get all of them away. the zoo says it's not sure if the boy died from the fall or attack. there were 11 dogs in the exhibit, one of them had to be killed. >>> few details tonight in a deadly shooting overnight in southeast d.c. someone called police around 2:15 this morning to report gunshots here. police found a 19-year-old man dead in a parking lot behind an apartment lot later this morning, investigators were focused on a wooded lot. no arre
and the northeast is drying out but not really warming up. temperatures still in the 40s in new york city and boston. the 80s still dominate texas for the time being. look at the cold air with this next system that. continues to push eastward into your weekend. we've got showers, perhaps some thunderstorms here in the midwest and plenty of snow and cold air all the way down towards phoenix. a high of 63 as we head towards the weekend. northeast slowly warming up, melting that snow pretty rapidly. sunday temperatures warming up across the east. meanwhile showers and thunderstorms across the middle of the country and the 80s here in texas behind the system. temperatures denver only 30 for a high temperature. 25 in billings. now we're pushing the low 60s from d.c., new york, even towards boston as we head towards the end of the weekend. into next week here comes a front into the midwest and the ohio valley giving you some scattered showers and thunderstorms. look at the temperature contrast. chicago 40, kansas city 40. but still 60 in louisville ahead of that front. here comes yet more rain and mountai
running the boston marathon and you see the ribbon at the end, and you're like look, we're almost done. >> listen and also remember for president obama, this is his last campaign in his life. this is an end of a political career in that sense. so it's got to have some sort of nostalgia. but the emotion, the charged up, the scrutiny they've been under. the schedule they've been under. both of them, it's a day full of emotion. >> michelle obama, much tougher than i've heard her. >> -- defend her husband. >> let me tell you something, personally wasn't happy when i said it but i said seriously your wife blows you aware on campaigning. i've seen her speak without notes, without teleprompter and she really goes all in, and she's a phenomenal campaigner. >> but iowa, the place is really important for this president. because the people he was talking to there are the people who gave him the legs politically that allowed him to become president of the united states. you think about when hillary clinton was in there for the caucuses, remember, and how it was clinton, it was clinton, it was edwa
, florida. there's boston, massachusetts. there's the san francisco bay area. there is seattle, up in washington state. there's san diego. there's tampa, florida in the st. petersburg area. there's baltimore, maryland. there's the virginia beach area, that metro area including norfolk. there is jacksonville, florida. and, of course, there is new orleans. so pop quiz. what do all of these large american cities have in common? you can cheat by looking at this map. what do all of these large american population centers have in common? the answer is that all of these major american cities are right on the edge of america. right on the coastal edge, up next to the sea. now, you could also add even some more major cities to this list if you wanted to. places like philadelphia or washington, d.c. or houston or providence, rhode island. those are all sort of coastal cities, too, in the sense that they are near the coast and they're on waterways. just for the sake of argument, let's not even include those. let's just be narrowly focused here, talking narrowly about big populous metropolitan
. live look. president obama headquarters in chicago. governor romney in boston. we'll take you there live in a moment. we are getting information on why they vote the way they are. martha maccallum will cover that for us. >> reporter: they are analyzing the response as they come out of the polling places tonight. there are key states like ohio and virginia. the polls are still open for hours as people come home from work and continue to vote. so many areas we haven't heard from yet. what we can tell you for sure so far is that this is a very tight race tonight. let's start with the national poll question. direction of the country. are we on the right track or the wrong track? it's evenly divided. those saying we are on the right direction and going for president obama, no surprise there. 52%, though, say we are headed in the wrong direction. they are backing governor romney. now voters are split on whether the economy is getting better or worse. huge question tonight for everyone, of course. you have about four out of ten states getting better. three of ten say it's getting wor
the obama campaign and boston behind the scenes with romney. to the heated battleground states across the country where this election will be decided and our team tracking your vote everywhere in the crossroads of the world with the crowds in times square. and with our partners from univision in miami plus abc's barbara walters, katie couric and our powerhouse team telling you who's winning and why on this historic night, election night 2012, the stakes so high, the race so close, america's next president decided tonight. it's "your voice, your vote." once again from abc news election headquarters in times square, new york, diane sawyer and george stephanopoulos. >> you are looking at times square, usa, the pulse of the nation. also the crossroads of the world, 182 million people pass through here every year and tonight, it is election headquarters for abc news and we are so glad to have you back with us on this very big night, george. >> we have an entire team right out here with us. our reporters an analysts over on that side of the room, jon karl karl, cokie robert, ron brownstein.
at the temperatures. charleston, west virginia, cold, 40, boston, 42 but everybody else in the 30s. new york city at 39. that means the outskirts outside of the city even colder closer to freezing and the windchills this morning are right there with you. i'd love to tell you it gets warm the next couple of mornings but people still getting power back in atlantic cities close to freezing by early tuesday. it's not going to be all that nice and then we have to talk about that storm, of course, you have that jet stream holding on to the cold air that will grab moisture down in the southeast and that's where it picks up the pace and it starts to form the nor'easter. you'll have rain showers from the carolinas on tuesday down into florida, then for your wednesday, it starts to move north. that's when the winds pick up in the northeast, 40 to 50-mile-per-hour winds, and then by thursday it really mixes in with some cold air, coastal new england gets the rain, back here in upstate new york, the poconos into the snow. how much and what to expect. here it is, 1 to 3 inches of rain, 6 to 12-foot waves and,
, and everybody -- not only at this network, at nbc, abc, cbs, in boston, in austin, all talking about president kerry. that was two hours before the polls closed. >> bob shrum. >> everybody knew that john kerry had won the race. everybody. let me repeat. everybody. two hours before. and then we all remembered what happened in new hampshire when everybody was dancing on hillary clinton's grave. >> oh, my god. >> the day of the new hampshire primary. >> let's look at primary crowds. >> mika and i, we're at a nashua gym and saw hillary up there speaking. >> they were, like, bringing people in from out of state. >> everybody came in from massachusetts. and i said, you know, she deserves a better ending than this. and yet, you never know until americans go into the voting booth and vote. >> well, i recall in new hampshire in february of 2008 being in the lobby of the holiday inn with you and telling you that i had just bumped into lou dellesandrou who was running hillary's campaign. >> and everybody laughed. >> everybody did laugh. that gets to the ultimate magic and mystery that is election day. th
night at the boston convention center. you can see some of the exhaustion show. romney's demeanor hinting at anything? that he somehow thinks he might not get there? >> you're tired of being tired. not just tonight but all the time. >> people overreading body language a little bit. after reports ann romney appeared exhausted at a series. one of mrs. romney's aides wanted to assure nbc news it's about being tired, nothing about her ms acting up. on the trail this in virginia, mitt romney argued that he is the changed candidate this year. >> instead of bridging the divide, he's made it wider. >> if the president were to be re-elected, he would -- it's possible but not likely. if he were to be re-elected, he would be able to work with president in congress. >> the bitterness between the two campaigns is palpable. there are signs that governing will be a huge challenge for the winner. protesters interrupted the president's rally in ohio and at every stop romney seized on this recent comment from the president. >> don't boo, vote. vote. voting's the best revenge. >> president obama ask
, and one in pennsylvania. joined now by peter hamby live at the romney headquarters in boston, massachusetts. peter, these are sort of late additions to the schedule. . >> yeah, and travel is the best indicator of a campaign's thinking. we've known that pennsylvania sort of last-minute gamble/insurance policy for the romney campaign. 96% of the vote is on the table there today, because there isn't really early voting. but the ohio travel jumped out at me and paul ryan is also going to ohio today, john. this signals to me that they are nervous about ohio, as they have been. but they're just a little more nervous in these closing days. but, you know, romney himself, of course, is projecting confidence outwardly. check out this rally last night in new hampshire that pulled 12,000 people. this is what he said. >> we have known many long days and short nights, and now we're close. the door to a brighter future is there. it's open. it's waiting for us. i need your vote. i need your help. walk with me. walk together. tomorrow we begin a new tomorrow. >> there is, john, an air of anxi
? >> it's going to be very tight. i would hate to be sitting in boston or chicago, because it's going to be a very, very long, long day for them and a long night as well. jon: what are you going to be looking for first? >> first -- as the early states come in, indiana and kentucky i'm going to be looking from the swing from where obama was four years ago to where he is today. the first important state is going to be virginia. the problem is we'll get some smaller county in toto early but some of the bigger jurisdiction -rs going to take a longtime to come in. i'm going to be looking for the counties, prince william and loudon. i'm going to be looking for african-american turn out in petersburg in what is called the south side and i'm going to be looking to compare in the heartland and the anti-obama coal country, i'll be looking for the difference between 08 and this year for president obama and romney vs. mccain. jon: the polling seems this is a tie. from what you're saying you seem to be saying that as well. >> i think it is up for grabs. we have a lot of confusing information out.
in the edwards school in boston, i use these examples because there are examples where we see things work, then let's use it to engage kids. we know if kids are engaged in music, they don't drop out. we know if you actually figure out what will spark an interest in kids whether it's robot particulars, for me it was civics because i was a social studies teacher, arts, physical education, sports, if you spark an interest in an add less sent, they'll stay. >> i'll go a step further. it seems like there was a time, randi, where parents were at fault. the schools are doing what they can, now it's parents, parents, parents. now it's teachers. they're insufficient, inadequate. we can't have them making living wages or any of those kinds of things. >> right. really, really important but we're going to bash them and we don't want to hear their voice. >> it feels like not only do you need these kinds of things to keep students engaged, but teachers in order to feel excited and make a difference, you can't have 50 kids in a classroom and be teaching to a standardized test and feel at all points like
upper 50s and low 60s. boston 64, but back in buffalo where the cold air, is 36, 33 in pittsburgh, and then by tomorrow that front is through, and look at the temperatures tumble about 10 to 15 degrees. 39 in pittsburgh, 45 in new york city. bangor 43. nashville where they have freezy fog this morning >> good morning. we will start off today with off and on rain showers. sunshine should break out later today. >> don't forget, get that weather any time you need. go to the weather channel on cable or weather.com online. savannah? >> all right, al, thanks. the man behind elmo is taking a leave of absence from "sesame street why the "to deal with very serious allegations. nbc's mara schiavocampo is here with more on this. >> reporter: good morning. this would be no elmo without robert clash but the puppeteer who created elmo is coming forward after a man claimed forward saying he had an intimate relationship with clash while he was still a minor. ♪ >> reporter: though he's best known as the voice of elmo, revered puppeteer kevin clash is now speaking out in his own defense against a
has enough money to hire a new assistant and he hires a promising young man from boston and he teaches them how to be a journalist and report about slavery and the great irony they would want to die in obscurity and he would go on to become the most famous abolitionist editor and one of the most influential american journalists of the 19th book, too. you probably think the only important thing that he did in his life is write the lyrics to the star spangled banner. he went into an interesting career in politics which is completely unknown to most people she was the modern washington character after he became famous in 1814 for writing the star spangled banner he did what people in washington usually do and he parlayed his fame into a lucrative practice and the political connection into jobs in the of the culmination of francis scott key's in 1833 when he was appointed to be the district attorney for the city of washington. what he did in that time i wouldn't say that was as significant as right in the star spangled banner which was obviously an enduring bet but it was really important.
of his top advisers that he's known in boston for more than a decade. they're taking pictures on the stairs. the plane, a sense we're going to give this one last go here on the long strange trip we've been on. interesting hope and nostalgia from the romney camp today. >> it's interesting. nostalgia. is that coupled with a positive sense? a negative sense? sometimes you would rather be looking forward, i would presume, than looking back. >> well, i think it's still a positive thing. remember, this is a guy who's been running for president of the country for the last six years. with most of the same team. all of whom will be happy to get the campaign behind them one way or another. i can tell you on the plane today was ike leavitt, running the transition projects for governor romney. so they're certainly not discounting the possibility he's going to win this thing. >> and i understand as we're looking at a picture of mitt romney and his wife ann there by his side, she was traveling around through the plane and made a stop back there with the media. >> that's right. we haven't se
hospitalized in boston. the 83-year-old was rushed from his prison cell to a hospital yesterday after complaining of chest pains. bulger, the man who inspired jack nicholson's character in "the departed" is awaiting trial for his role in 19 murders. >>> that is zach potter. inspiring a nation by climbing to the top of chicago's 103-story willis tower. zach lost his leg in a motorcycle accident three years ago. doctors out fitted the 31-year-old with the world's first neurocontrolled bionic leg. he used it to scale the former sears tower in just over 53 minutes. that's incredible. >>> coming up, the economy is a top issue in this election. and president obama has consistently trailed mitt romney on that issue. so what does that mean for tomorrow's election? one of the nation's top economists, larry summers, is going to join us next. harge of . how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they want. where they want. doing what they want. ameriprise. the strength o
in, quick out and get back to boston and start preparing for victory tomorrow night. jon: your prediction victory. >> i think romney will win a close race. jon: ed rollins, thanks very much. >> my pleasure. jenna: i have a feeling my next guest might disagree with that. that's why we have him on. lanny davis, from the d.c. bureau. forever former white house counsel for the clinton administration and fox news contributor. ed, excellent chance mitt romney has. what say you? >> i think ed rollins has it right on everything but his prediction. let's start with undeniable fact, even though i'm a democrat already voted for barack obama. mitt romney deserves a lot of credit for closing a gap by the end of september looked like would be a landslide victory for barack obama. to imagine that obama is actually in some polls in a tie vote in pennsylvania, which was 15 points lead, as recently as 30-days ago, you have to give credit to the surge of mitt romney that started with the first debate but has leveled off. jenna: lanny, why isn't it enough? >> it has leveled off because of two reas
in boston, it's anyone's choice, but it is that event in some ways that we go back to. now, james baldwin, i had great time writing this book, but i just wrote about the writers that just wanted to write about it, quoting them, end graphs, just using them for years until i finally decided i'm going to write about them and see what shape the book takes. baldwin, to me, is the most revealing. i'd always basically just quoted him, plucked passages as we all do. baldwin the essayist. baldwin, the nonfiction voice of the civil rights movement is something everyone should go back to revisit. in the collection, nobody knows my name, or in the collection, previous non-fiction collections or most famously, baldwin made himself the voice that was constantly, constantly asking why can't americans remember slavery? why don't they want to face their history with racism, why don't they want to look back at the emancipation process, why won't they look back at reconstruction? why won't they? he does it in the interview with baldwin, in the quick silver, you know, quick fire, quick method in appealing an un
real. host: next call is from boston, on the democratic line. caller: from the iranian perspective, i would like to remind you that it was the united states that fired the first shot when it launched a virus against a dangerous situation. perhaps you did not think they would respond. if you did not, you should not be in the job you are in. have a nice day. guest: i don't know what the question was. host: let's hear from an independent scholar in ohio. caller: morning, i am fascinated about how many people are against this cyber security act. why would the government have to tell you to lock your front door and closed her windows at night to keep people from breaking in? if you live in a neighborhood where there is a large number of these break-ins, it is common sense that the neighbors would get together and tell each other about the different methods that were being used, not what you have in your house. if you run a business and you don't lock your front gate or your doors are file cabinets, you are an idiot. why the government should even have to tell you that -- if you had the hop
kind of, you know, making that commute to boston area and moving from out of state in might have something to do with that swing. >> sure it does. brian, thanks very much. we'll watch new hampshire and the four electoral votes. >> our next battleground stop is colorado with its nine electoral votes. just like ohio, went for barack obama in 2008 after helping george w. bush win the white house in 2004. cnn's kung la is in colorado. are you getting a sense of who has the upper hand? >> reporter: well, the republicans saying they have the upper hand looking at who's actually voted, cast that vote, the republicans are leading by about 25,000 votes but that's not very much of a gap. what we're seeing here in this location i'm standing in, the early voting as you mentioned, kate, is over. but what people are doing is dropping off early ballots. they're -- these are the mail-in ballots. they can drop them off and murphy's law, no one's here but they can drive up, give their ballot to this gentleman and then he'll take the ballot and drop it in this red box. from here, these ballots then
headquarters in boston. wendell goler live in chicago where president obama arrived a little while ago. phil keating is in florida with a lot going on down there. let's start with john since romney will be the first to cast his ballot today. >> that will be in massachusetts in an hour and 45 minutes. for the romney campaign, it's all about getting out the vote. when you look at the 11 swing states, he only leads in two. the others are all within the margin of error. he's going to hit the trail again today, going to the vote center in cleveland later on this morning. this afternoon, another in pittsburgh. paul ryan will be in richmond and also join the governor in cleveland. the governor was sitting around in the tarmac yesterday, according to an advisor saying, i don't want to sit in a hotel room all day on election day. let's go out and do what we can to muster every last vote. when you look at the early voting, it's advantage obama right now. governor romney really has to rack up the count on his side of things. yesterday in columbus urging his supporters at a rally to get out there and ge
drawn to their homes, to chicago, to boston, and they end up in the dark of night and manchester, new hampshire, and des moines, iowa, pleading their case. and the emotion just pours out of them. and then everything that we've said for a year or two years, the punditry, the predictions, the who's going to win ohio, the who's going to win florida goes out the window because people go to the polls, they draw the curtain, and then the only place in the world where it happens, they vote, a peaceful transition occurs or power is retained by the president, it's a magical moment we don't pay enough attention to. >> you can hear exactly what mike's talking about in both of their voices last night. mitt romney's voice was strained. he declared his candidacy on june 2nd, 2011, 17 months ago. so it's all been leading up to that. president obama was brought to tears last night, wiped a tear away thinking about his long journey, his last campaign. so mike's right, these guys have poured it all out and now we're here. >> they have been out campaigning almost as long as we're going to be on this set
upper 50s and low 60s. boston 64, but back in buffalo where the cold air is, 36, 33 in pittsburgh, and then by tomorrow that front is through, and look at the temperatures tumble about 10 to 15 degrees. 39 in pittsburgh, 45 in new york city. bangor, 43. nashville where they have freezing fog this morning, temperatures moderate to about 42 degrees. that's what's going on around the >>> 7:36 on a tuesday morning. temperatures are about 5 degrees warmer than just 24 hours ago. not as frigid in santa rosa at 39 degrees. 39 in concord and 40 in livermore. you'll notice most of our winds now coming out of the east, that's offshore flow making way to a beautiful afternoon in the 70s in places like livermore. that goes for santa teresa. even santa cruz touching on the low 70s. we've got a lot of rain in the forecast but not until the end of the week. late thursday into friday our first showers arrive. >> don't forget, get that weather any time you need. go to the weather channel on cable or weather.com online. savannah? >> all right, al, thanks. the man behind elmo is taking a leave of ab
us tomorrow night in boston. >> good, he's bringing lots of money, i hope. >> of course. and other stuff. heilemann always -- >> by the way -- >> this is the big event that we are planning -- >> huge. >> you have to wear a mustache and perform. and if we raise $1 million for cure, which is for epilepsy research, david axelrod will shave his mustache off live on the show and we are almost there, like within about $100,000, apparently. >> usef contributed $50,000 and donald trump has contributed $100,000. >> have we got trump's cash yet? is it in? >> he's good for it. >> he's good for it. david knows trump. >> but we're literally about 100,000 away. >> what do you call rattner? >> he's calling friends too. >> i bet -- >> from his bath of money. >> i bet rattner could put us over the top. >> he could. >> put scotch tape on his fingers, go into the bathtub, and we're over the top. yeah, is rattner on today? buffe buffett's own, he'll give us -- he's got a couple billion to give away. >> that is mustache is gone. >> we're to our top story which has taken me six minutes to get to. three
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)